What Do You Do When Things Fall Apart?

What Do You Do When Things Fall Apart? What do you do when things fall apart? I mean, everything in your life is in pieces? Kirk Bentzgen- owner of the massive Performance Auto- is my favorite story of how to come back when everything looks utterly bleak.

How do you come back from divorce, losing your business, losing your father and getting brain cancer? This man is a hero, and his path back is a great guidebook for all of us struggling with loss. Watch and be inspired.

Need more uplifting stories?

What happens when your flight attendant daughter can’t come home for Christmas? 

Gentle ways to care for yourself during busy and stressful times- find it here.

 

Do you know someone who has overcome unimaginable odds to find happiness again? We’d love to talk to them- please email me at Erin@thetoddanderindailystream.com

 

You Can’t Come Home For Christmas? I’ll Come To You

 

You Can’t Come Home For Christmas? I’ll Come To You. When you’re new to your position, you get all the “non-popular” shifts, like the holidays. As for flight attendant Pierce Vaughan, she was unfortunately scheduled to work through Christmas Eve and Christmas.

Her dad Hal was not thrilled with this news, and decided that if she couldn’t join the family for Christmas, he would join her. So he mapped out all her flights- six in total- over the two days and booked a seat for each one.

 

Mike Levy happened to be on the first leg and seated next to Hal. After hearing the whole, sweet story he had to post about it on Facebook. Since then, the story’s been shared tens of thousands of times. Pierce also followed up on social media, since everyone was dying to find out how it all worked out. It was a challenging schedule, and when you’re on a “buddy pass,” like Hal was, you’re one of the first to get bumped if the flight was full. Here’s what she wrote:

“Dad’s first trip using his benefits was a success! A special thanks to all of the patient, wonderful gate agents around the country and my perfect crew. He made it on every flight and even got first class RSW-DTW (Christmas miracle).

Shoutout to Mike Levy for being a great first class passenger & helping us to understand how cool this actually is!”

I’m always filled with happiness when I see a family so devoted to each other.

5 Fresh Ways To Celebrate New Year’s Eve

 

(Image credit via Flickr: Simpleinsomnia)

5 Fresh Ways To Celebrate New Year’s Eve. Erin here… I have to be honest–years of hosting New Year’s Eve events as a radio “personality” leaves me with a loathing for the Big Drunken Bar Fest. It’s depressing being the only sober one in the room and trying to give away prizes to people too drunk to remember their name, much less read the teeny tiny numbers on their winning tickets.  Maybe you’re just looking for something different because you’re different–you’re a mom now, or you’re newly single.  Here’s some ideas I found poking around New Year’s Eve celebrations across the globe. (Editor’s note: stop by our Amazon.com page– I’ve picked out affordable options to help you enjoy all of these traditions.)

5 FRESH WAYS TO CELEBRATE NEW YEAR’S EVE

red undies

(photo credit: The Style PA)

1. Wear Red Lingerie: In Italy it is considered good luck to wear read underwear and lingerie on New Year’s Eve.  It is believed that wearing something red will give you good luck in love and relationships in the year to come.

 

night run

(photo credit: Peter Mooney)

2. Run: you don’t have to be training for a marathon to want to be stronger and leaner in 2019.  What better way to bring in the New Year than while exercising?  If you can run outside, bring a group of like minded friends and champagne in the water bottle.  My friend Cheryl snow shoes through the forest with her family to greet the New Year in utter, perfect silence.

 

jumping into the pool

(photo credit: Charlie G)

3. Jump: in Denmark they have a tradition of climbing onto a chair and jumping off at the stroke of midnight. How about going a little bigger?  Jump into a (heated) pool or body of water. Jump without fear into the New Year and all the adventures you’ll bring with it.

 

paying debts

(photo credit: Quazle)

4. Get Rid of Loose Ends: one of the many traditions of New Year’s celebrations in Vietnam, is a purging of unfinished business. Return all things you’ve borrowed and pay off any debts you can. Start off the new year with a clean slate.

 

flash paper

(photo credit: Chrls Blakely)

5. Burn, Baby Burn: pick up flash paper from a local magic shop or order online from here.  Write your worries, troubles, frustrations and things you want to leave behind as you head into the New Year.  Light and throw into a big pan or barrel–they flash white light with a very satisfying “whoosh!” as your troubles disappear along with 2018.

 

Our personal New Year’s Eve tradition? We use sky lanterns-write down a worry or trouble you want to leave behind from 2018, and a new wish or goal for 2019. Your worries fly away to be consumed by the flame-and your wishes are marked down by Fate to come true. (Obligatory warning: we of course check with the local fire department wherever we do this to make sure we’re following local regulations.)

An Exhaustive List Of Every Christmas Light Show Along The Wasatch Front

An Exhaustive List Of Every Christmas Light Show Along The Wasatch Front. I must hate myself. Really.  I do this to myself EVERY YEAR, but to my Littles, the light cruises are an indispensable part of the Holidays.  We circle city blocks for hours, marveling at the lights and amazing creations that people with more time, money and (clearly) intelligence can put together. Since the only thing it has to cost you is a gallon or two of gas, it’s one of the most affordable options. Here’s a breakdown by county along the Wasatch Front, including the wildly enthusiastic amateurs. You’re welcome.

(Editor’s note: if you’re looking for more ways to instill meaning and fun into the Holidays with the people you love, take a look at our post on “Creating Holiday Traditions” here.  And what about taking care of yourself, enjoying the Holidays instead of just “getting through another one,” by checking out our tips here.)

 

An Exhaustive List Of Every Christmas Light Show Along The Wasatch Front

 

 

Utah County:

6-10-pm: Spanish Fork Festival of Lights-runs every night through New Year’s Day. Tickets $7-30.

6:30-10pm: The Christmas Light Cruise on the Provo River-tickets are $8.00, children under 2 free.

5:30-10:30pm: Pond Town in Salem-a sweet light display on the pond at the center of town, free admission. The display runs through 1.2.15

5-10pm: The Shops At Riverwoods-is ablaze with lights through January 1, 2018.  There’s carriage rides Friday, Saturday and Monday.  Free admission, small charge for the carriage rides.

5-10pm: Provo Town Center-watch the free holiday light and music show through December 31, free admission. 351 W Center St, Provo

5-10:30pm: Christmas in Color– now at the Utah Lake Stake Park – Marina, 4400 Center St, Provo. $25-30 per car- no limit on how many passengers.

 

The Plucky Non-Professionals UC: free admission

936 S 200 E, Orem: 100,000 lights set to music

Adam says to be sure to hit the Fibernet building in Orem. The building is just East of the University Mall-they’ve added even more lights this year!

 

Salt Lake County:

5-10pm: The Lights At Temple Square-of course, the Grand MamaJama of all holiday lights is the heart-stopping display at Temple Square.  Open seven days a week through December 31, admission is free.  Be sure to stop by the reflecting pool.

6-9pm: Candlelight Christmas at This Is The Place State Park-discover the warm glow of a pioneer Christmas with dancing, crafts and a visit with Father Christmas.  Dude.  Hardcore…  Tickets: adults $11, kids $8, children under 2 free.  Runs December 8-27 Monday through Saturday, closed 24-25th.

5:30-9pm: Zoo Lights at Utah’s Hogle Zoo-I’m seriously considering putting sunglasses on the kids this year, it’s that wildly colored and bright.  Open through December 31st, tickets are $4-6 for members, and $7-5 for non-members.

5-11pm: Light Up The Night At The Gateway Mall-hundreds of thousands of lights. including a wildly rotating color wheel on their gigantic Christmas Tree.  Free admission, open through January 2, 2018.

Noon-6pm: Gallivan Center Ice Skating Rink and Light Display-gorgeous neon splashes of color all over the Gallivan Center, plus ice skating and a fire barrel!  Check here for sudden closures or schedule changes.  Admission to see the lights is free, ice rink is a small fee.

5-10pm: The Lights At Gardner Village-there’s free admission and Elf Hunts!  Runs through December 31.

Dusk to 11pm: The “Tree Of Life” is a beautiful addition to the Draper City Park–thousands of white lights that have created kind of a draw for spiritual seekers to the tree.  Draper City Park, 12500 South 1300 East.

5:30-11pm: Christmas in Color – a high-tech animated display from the group that creates the Midway Ice Castles. $20 per car on weekdays, $25 on weekends. (No limit to how many per car.) Salt Lake County Equestrian Park, 11161 s 2200 W, South Jordan.

 

frosty

The Plucky Non-Professionals SLC: free admission

Christmas Street: 5400 South 3200 West, Salt Lake City.  Best seen on foot.

Christmas Street Sugarhouse: the oldest neighborhood to claim the title here in Utah. Glen Arbor St, Salt Lake City

Christenson & Hymas Light Display: tune your radio to 99.5 for the music that goes with the show. 11693 S. 700 E., Draper

Frosty’s Winter Wonderland: something new goes up every night, slow for a moment and Frosty or one of his kids will trot over to hand you a candy cane. 805 E 18th Ave, Salt Lake City

1528 W 8740 S, West Jordan:

Lights on Wakefield: if you’d like to donate, they’re raising money for the Mascot Miracles Foundation (pediatric cancer) tune your radio to 87.9fm. 6388 S. Wakefield Way (5885 W.)

 

Toole County: 

6-9pm: Clark Historic Farm, live nativity and luminary walk.  Tickets $2 per person, or $1 with food donation.

 

The Plucky Non-Professionals TC: free admission

Lights on 1310: Sunday-Thursday 6-10pm, Friday-Saturday 6-11pm

Wait!  There’s more from the Toole Transcript here.

 

 

Davis County:

Dusk-11pm: Layton City Lights In The Park-free admission, open through January 1.

 

The Plucky Non-Professionals DC: free admission.

1600 S 1100 W, Syracuse: 25 years of light display madness

2413 N 2100 W, Clinton:

1385 S 2600 W, Syracuse:

354 E 200 S, Clearfield

223 N 1400 W, Clearfield: Christmas lights dance to the music, set your channel to 93.7fm

The Lights On Sherwood Drive: huge display in Kaysville – 5:30-10pm

 

Weber County:

5-9pm: Ogden’s Christmas Village-free admission, meet with Santa, take a tour of the homes.  Crafts, photos with Santa and food available for sale.  Runs through December 31.

 

 

The Plucky Non-Professionals WC: free admission

Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Exeter Dr, Morgan: admission is free, but they’re asking for donations for Primary Children’s Medical Center if you’re so inclined.

 

Box Elder County:

5-10pm: Fantasy At The Bay, Willard Bay State Park-my kids LOVE this wonderful display.   Take a horse-drawn wagon ride through the lights for free, but PLEASE tip the driver–this sweet man offers the service for free because he doesn’t want any child disappointed.  Admission is 50% off on Wednesdays, and get a $1.00 off coupon here.  It’s worth the drive.  Open through December 31, seven days a week.

 

The Plucky Non-Professionals BEC: free admission:

The Hooper Holiday House:  The Goodrich family is proud to invite you, turn the radio to 90.5 for musical accompaniment.

Tremonton-102 S Tremont St: lights synchronized to music, 5:30-11pm

 

Heading down south?

St. George has a huge collection of Holiday light displays, and the ambitious Braden with HedgeHog Electric compiled them all for you–it’s part of a fundraising drive for the Southwest Utah Habitat For Humanity.  You can find that excellent Holiday map here.

The St. George LDS Temple’s light display is back and exceptionally beautiful this year. Details here.

 

Okay, seriously, I can no longer feel my fingers.  I’ve been writing this post for the last 5 hours.  Yet, there are more!  Be sure to check here for more enthusiastic amateurs.  There’s bound to be a house or two near you.  I’m sure that there’s great places I’ve missed.  Please add your two cents in a comment below.  C’mon!  It’s for the children…

Five New Holiday Traditions To Try

Five New Holiday Traditions To Try. I’d forgotten the excitement the twins used to show when we’d open the boxes filled with Christmas decorations. Now they’re 18 and too cool (I think they still dig it) to show it. But 7 year old Zoe is all about asking “where did we get those stars?” And “is it time to see the ZooLights yet?” If you’re looking for some new ideas to try, these are good thought starters…

 

Five New Holiday Traditions To Try:

1. The Christmas Tree Ring Memory String:

The Todd thought of this our first Christmas together, when he grabbed the slice we’d just taken off the tree stump and labeled it “T+E 1997.”  It’s so fun to add a new tree ring every year…and now the Memory String stretches clear across our living room.

 

 

2. The 12 Days Of Christmas Melee:

I’ve tried doing the “12 Days of Christmas” tradition, and it’s exhausting.  But if you do it with your family or a group of friends, it becomes fun, intriguing, and usually stupidly entertaining.  Assign one or two of the 12 days to each family member or friend.  They need to do something for another member of the group, in secret, giving nothing away.  It can be as small as cleaning the snow off the car and having it heated up and ready when that person goes to work, or as fancy as a Singing Elf Delivery Gram (don’t ask, my friend Steve delivered it to The Todd, and let’s say Steve enjoyed wearing those Elf tights, dancing and singing a little too much.)  On Christmas Eve, everyone has to figure out who did what or gave what to whom.   There’s laughter, shrieking and some really brilliant ideas that come to light.

 

 

3. Project Adopt Grandma/Graduate Student/Refugee Family:

Bear with me.  Sometimes this means coming out of your comfort zone a little.  But there’s thousands of people in your city or town that think a day spent with you would be amazing, and it doesn’t need to be on Christmas, or Kwanzaa or Hanukkah, or whatever you might celebrate.

  • For older folks in a care facility, they may not be able to get out to shop for loved ones, mail packages, get their hair done, buy a nice red coat for church.  A day with your patience, friendly kids and transportation would make their holiday.  Check in with your local Elder Care facilities and Meals On Wheels for a referral.
  • Graduate students at your local college are likely broke, new to town and maybe new to this country.  Some of our very best Christmas Eves were spent going round the room and having everyone talk about what “Higher Power” meant to them.  To Jennika from the Ukraine, Higher Power was the feeling she got from her  music as a concert pianist.  For Yen from Communist China, the joy he felt from complex math equations “filled his spirit” as he said.  Check with Student Services and the school church groups.
  • Refugee families are my favorite: the courageous little families make their way to our country from every corner of the globe.  I have never worked with one that wasn’t thrilled and grateful to be here and wanting so much to be part of the community.  But it’s scary: language barriers, confusion over customs, transportation problems–they are frightening and discouraging for anyone.  Teaching the families about the Holidays and some of the different ones everyone shares is a wonderful experience.  We help the kids make small crafts and gifts for their parents, take the family to see the lights or a concert.   Check with your local Catholic Refugee Services for placement suggestions.

 

4. The Epic Tour Of Lights:

This needs to only cost you a gallon of gas.  Everyone in the family maps out their favorite lit-up houses for the holidays.  Plug ‘em into your iPhone or make a little map.  Pass out the cocoa and get the car started.  Try LightMuse or ChristmasLightFinder to get you started.  Locals here along the Wasatch Front, there’s an incredible list that’s either free as a drive-by (F) or nominal cost ($):

 

5.  Japanese Sky Lanterns & New Year’s Eve Wishes:

My favorite of our new traditions.  Japanese sky lanterns are inexpensive and heart-stoppingly beautiful.  Just before midnight, we take our lantern and write a wish for the upcoming year on one side, and a worry from the year we’re leaving on the other side.  As the clock turns 12, we send our lanterns into the sky, carrying our wishes to the heavens as our worries burn away with the paper.  I’ve found inexpensive sky lanterns in bulk here.  (Editor’s note: this is very important: many municipalities will have their own laws about the use of these lanterns. Please check first, and make sure you use a clear space with an open skyline to set your lanterns into the sky.)

 

 

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Meet the kindest police officer in North America

Meet the kindest police officer in North America. This is West Jordan Police Officer Lofgren, who answered a domestic violence call. Police officers will tell you that these kinds of calls are the worst– painful, sad, generally awful in every way. But Officer Lofgren brought mom and kiddos to the police station to file a report, and while the shaken woman was being led through paperwork, he quietly took over the her little ones, right down to feeding the baby with such tenderness.

Thank you Officer Lofgren for redeeming our faith in the kindness of strangers!

The Power Of An Apology & The Power Of Forgiveness

The Power Of An Apology & The Power Of Forgiveness. On Veteran’s Day weekend- I thought this was the most inspiring thing we could share. Pete Davidson of Saturday Night Live spoke offensively about a Republican political candidate in Texas- Lt. Com. Dan Crenshaw by mocking his eyepatch in a show a couple of weeks ago. Lt. Com. Crenshaw lost his eye to an explosion while serving his third tour in Afghanistan. There were death threats, calling for blood, calling of names. But instead the two men got together on this Saturday’s SNL show and Pete respectfully apologized to Lt. Com Crenshaw for his behavior. Now, here’s the really cool part- Crenshaw graciously accepted his apology. Poked some fun at Pete. And spoke movingly about veterans and how we can all support them. Please watch- this is amazing. And to all our veterans: Never Forget.

(Cover image credit: Saturday Night Live)

Kid-Tested (And Kid-Approved) Jokes

Kid-Tested (And Kid-Approved) Jokes. I’m not going to lie, I looked these up with my second-grader as self-defense. There’s only so many “jokes” that don’t go anywhere that I can take, and now that my Zoe’s seven, she is the Queen of Truly Terrible Puns- she can barely get the joke out before dissolving into hysterical laughter.  If your little people are still open to the fun of the dorky joke, try these on for size…

Kid-Tested (And Kid-Approved) Jokes:

Why do bees have sticky hair?
  -Because they use honeycombs.
Why was the man running around his bed?
  -He wanted to catch up on his sleep.
Why did the chicken cross the playground?
  -To get to the other slide.
What do you call a pig that knows karate?
  – A pork chop!
What does a robot frog say?
  -Rib-bot. (Channeling R2D2)
Why is 6 afraid of 7?
  -Because 7 8 9!
What’s black and white, black and white, black and white?
  -A penguin rolling down a hill!
Why do cows wear bells?
  -Because their horns don’t work!
What does a snail say when it’s riding on a turtle’s back?
  -Weeeee!!
How did the barber win the race?
  -He knew a short cut.

Knock Knock Jokes

Knock, knock.
  –Who’s there?
Interrupting cow.
  –Interrupting c..
MOO!!!
Knock, knock. 
  -Who’s there?
Boo.
  –Boo who?
Please don’t cry. It’s only a joke.
Knock, knock.
  –Who’s there?
Nobody.
  –Nobody who?
(Stay silent)
Knock, knock.
  –Who’s there?
Little old lady.
  –Little old lady who?
I didn’t know you could yodel!
Knock, knock.
  –Who’s there?
Cows say.
  –Cows say who?
No silly, cows say moo!
Knock, knock.
  -Who’s there?
Owls say.
  –Owls say who?
Yep.
Knock, knock.
  –Who’s there?
Tank.
  –Tank who?
You’re welcome!

Even More Kid-Tested (And Kid-Approved) Jokes

What is brown and sticky? –A stick!
Why did half a chicken cross the road? – To get to his other side
How do you make a tissue dance? – Put a little boogie in it.
Knock, knock. – Who’s there? Smell mop. – Smell mop who?
Where do library books like to sleep? – Under their covers!
Why can’t a bicycle stand up by itself? – Because it’s two-tired!
Knock, knock. – Who’s there? Yourself. – Yourself who? Your cell phone’s ringing you better answer it.
What did zero say to eight? – Nice belt!
Where do sheep get their wool cut? – At the BAAAbars!
What’s mom and dad’s favorite ride at a fair? – A married-go-round!
Where do cows go on Friday night? – To the MOOOvie theater.
Where did the king keep his armies? – In his sleevies!
And my Zoe’s favorite…
Knock, knock. –Who’s there? Banana. –Banana who? Knock, knock. –Who’s there? Banana –Banana who? Knock, knock. – Who’s there? Orange. –Orange who? Orange you glad I didn’t say banana again?

How To Keep Every Student In High School – East High’s Innovative Approach

How To Keep Every Student In High School – East High’s Innovative Approach. The eternal question: HOW do you help the kids in desperate need at your high school without creating the social divide of “us vs. them?” The PTSA and Student and Family Support Organization at East High School in Salt Lake City has created a genius program. There’s a large number of kids under the poverty line, refugee students who might even be the head of their little household, homeless kids stubbornly coming to class every day.

 

But they need more than just food. Maybe a bus pass because they don’t have transportation, an emergency dentist donating time if a student knocks his tooth out in football practice (true story.) So they created the Stash, where all kinds of students- athletes, student body leaders, and those who are truly, truly hungry stop by for healthy snacks.

 

There’s school supplies, toiletries, even groceries to take home for their family. But it’s so much more! A place to shower, make phone calls, wash their clothes. The Leopard Boutique where they can find clean, attractive clothes. It’s genius. Want to donate items, money or your time? Please contact: Kris.Barta@slcschools.org

5 Veggies You Can Regrow From Kitchen Scraps

5 Veggies You Can Regrow From Kitchen Scraps. This was the first year EVER that the Todd and I had a sunny enough space for a garden. So Todd and Zoe happily planted little tomatoes and swiss chard, cucumbers and beets. And pumpkins! We just cut them today to decorate for Halloween!

(Editor’s note: for more natural material-based decor for the season, have a look at “Magic Wand-Making 101” here and the Todd’s Corn Critters here.)

 

But sadly, we had our first hard freeze last night and we dragged in 42,007 little green tomatoes last night to ripen inside- we’ll have the easy DIY video for that tomorrow, in case you, too, were overly blessed with produce this fall. So now we have to move the whole fresh produce scenario inside. Which is where growing your own from kitchen scraps comes in. I am not kidding!

 

 

(image credit: rudy.kleysteuber)
Seriously, how handy is THAT? One of my ultra-disaster prep friends is crazed about this, but I like the concept for two reasons.

1-What a great money-saver to re-grow your own foods in a small garden space.

2-That’s just so COOL.

Anyway, growing your own veggies is a good way to make sure you’re not feeding the offspring something packed with pesticides and such. And I love the idea that it’s one less thing that we’re dependent on finding at the store. Find complete directions linked with each category.

 

5 Veggies You Can Regrow From Kitchen Scraps

1. Potatoes and Sweet Potatoes:

Both re-grow nicely in a limited amount of soil. I strongly suggest buying organic- that reduces your chance of any diseases than can affect a potato crop. If you don’t already have some accidentally sprouted potatoes, (which is invariably how we start our plantings after finding the neglected potato basket) put two or three samples from your favorite varieties in a basket and place it in a cool, dark place. I store them in a cupboard underneath the sink, but if that’s too damp, try a dark corner of the basement. Check the potatoes after about two weeks, and pull them out to use once the sprouts begin to grow. Each “eye” or sprout can grow into its own plant, so cut the potatoes into chunks with one or two eyes in each. Set the chunks overnight on a layer of paper towels to allow the cut sides to dry a bit before planting. This eliminates the pieces from rotting after they’re planted. (Been there, done that.) You want a nice big container for these little fellas, and use potting soil instead of gardening soil. Keep the planter in full sunlight.

 

 

2. Leeks, Scallions and Fennel:

Can all be re-grown in jars on the kitchen windowsill. It’s ridiculously simple: take the leftover base- the bulb or enough of the veggie’s base that contains the roots. Drop them in a glass with enough water to cover them, and move the plantings around so the roots are pointing down. Leave the jar in some decent sunlight, on your kitchen windowsill. Be sure to change the old water for fresh every couple of days so they don’t get… ugh… slimy. Within a week or so, you’ll see a nice little sprouting for fresh greens.

 

 

 

3. Celery, Cabbage, Bok Choy:

All sprout beautifully from their original stems. Chop the veggie with a couple of inches left at the base. Place in a flat-bottomed dish with the base submerged about halfway. Warm water works best when you’re first getting these little fellas to sprout. The outside stalks will dry out, but you’re looking for those tender little yellow leaves in the center, which which grow nicely and turn green within a week or so. You can enjoy them right from the windowsill by slicing off what you want and keeping the original base, or you can plant the base in a pot with a mixture of dirt and potting soil- make sure the little sprouting leaves are above the surface- and it will grow as much as you like.

 

 

4. Mushrooms:

Don’t need light or much room, and they’re densely packed with nutrients. I have found that whatever type you want to grow does take a bit of a different approach, so I’m sending you Wikihow.com for precise instructions. We grow the little white button mushrooms, but you can go quite exotic if you have the taste for them.

 

5. Garlic and Onions:

Are surprisingly some of the easiest veggies to re-grow and have one of the shortest growing times. If you place a sprouted onion with the roots down in a glass of water, it will continue to grow on the top with new shoots. You can use the green, newly sprouted part for chopping up and using in recipes. If you want the whole garlic bulb or whole onion, you can plant it, roots and all, in soil. I have a soft spot for Vidalia onions, and they’re delighted to grow with the least possible encouragement. I like my veggies low-maintenance, because my attention span is pitifully short. My 7 year old Zoe likes to plant an onion base in a pretty dish with water and some decorative rocks. It grows on her windowsill and we chop the new growth off at the base for dinner and the process begins again. I’m sure there’s some deeply philosophical life lesson I can teach her from this, but… she still thinks it’s a magic trick. But then, nature is kind of magical, isn’t it?