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The Five Creepiest Utah Cemeteries

The Five Creepiest Utah Cemeteries. I grew up in the Avenues here in Salt Lake City, just a couple of blocks from the venerable city cemetery. So we played hide and seek around the tombstones, ran circles around Emo’s Grave and dared the night watchman to chase us down after hours. I didn’t get the full respect and fear for the resting places of the dead until I went on a ghost hunt at the Mercur Cemetery in my teens.

 

ghost hunting

(photo credit: Andy Wilkes)

Speaking of ghost hunting…

Ghost Hunt Etiquette:

  • Many areas are private property, without getting permission, you run the risk of trespassing.
  • Do some research on the spooky spot first, so you’ll have a better idea of where the phenomenon comes from.
  • Double-check all your recording sources afterward, many things are picked up on tape that can’t be heard live.
  • Be respectful: don’t trample on gravestones, stir up sod, disturb flower arrangements, etc.

Now that we’re entering the crisp days of fall and our thoughts turn to all things creepy, it’s the perfect time to explore some truly terrifying spots here in our Pretty, Great State.

 

BTW: Still looking for some super creepy spots? Check out our “Utah’s 5 most haunted spots” here, and “5 Utah ghost towns you simply must explore” here.

We’re here for you, honey. Right up to the point of taking care of your therapy bills afterward. That’s your problem.

 

The Five Creepiest Utah Cemeteries

mercur

(photo credit: Niki Chan)

1. Mercur Cemetery:

The mining town of Mercur started in the 1870s, but it was a disastrous fire in 1902 that destroyed the entire town. The graveyard stubbornly persists, though no one’s been buried there since 1913. Picket fences surround 20 of the graves–but walk carefully, you’ll stumble over random tombstones if you’re not watching the uneven ground. Ghost hunters report seeing phantasmagoric flames rising from the graveyard and when taking pictures, terrifying faces would suddenly appear in front of the lens. Close enough to touch. EEEEEEEEEEE!

 

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(photo credit: Norm Thomas)

2. Pleasant Green Cemetery:

I find nothing “pleasant” about watching tombstones glow when a train passes by, but those of us screeching like a barn owl that night certainly witnessed the phenomenon. Pleasant Green’s graveyard was established in 1883, perched on a hill over Magna. The grave of “Sarah J” is often photographed with disturbed earth–like something is trying to dig out–not in.

 

 

3. Salt Lake City Cemetery:

I have decades-worth of stories about the scariness of this place – where to begin? Emo’s Grave is likely the most famous – run around the grave 3 times chanting “Emo, Emo, Emo!” and the scary old phantasm is supposed to leave his urn and chase you. There’s all kinds of creepy, crumbling tombs that look uncomfortably open and accessible. But the spot that scares ghost hunters the most has to be Lilly Gray’s tombstone: where her grieving husband had carved “Victim of the Beast 666.” Legend states poor Lilly was the victim of demonic possession. All I can tell you is that the sod around her grave can suddenly turn spongy and soft where you’re standing, winds blow up from nowhere and wordless howling will send you screaming out of the cemetery.

 

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(photo credit: Scott Law)

4. Ephraim Pioneer Cemetery:

This graveyard wasn’t really intended to exist – a settler in Fort Ephraim passed away and was set to be buried in the nearby Allred Settlement. But after a warning of an Indian attack, pioneers hastily buried the man just outside the walls. He was joined by dozens more, including several children who died in an Indian massacre. Sad little voices will ask you to “take me home!” and the wails of mourning parents echo through the tombstones.

 

the weeping woman

(photo credit: Holly Murdock)

5. Logan Cemetery:

Wait for the night of a full moon and watch tears pour down the face of The Weeping Woman. There’s scores of soldiers buried here, and there’s sounds of battle, shouts and screams that rise from nowhere to a deafening roar, then suddenly stop.

(cover image credit: Pixabay)

So, do you have a favorite “final resting place” to explore? Have you seen anything? Please, share! We’ll post your photos and stories too.

5 Utah Ghost Towns You Simply Must Explore

(Image credit: Pixabay)
Five Utah ghost towns you simply must explore. There’s no better time than Fall to fill the gas tank and head out on an impromptu road trip, armed with nothing but a case of diet Pepsi and a box of Cap’n Crunch. But where to go? With all this hot weather, it’s time to send a chill right up your backside. If you’ve got the slightest bit of spooky sense, you should hit one of these five iconic ghost towns. Just be out of there by nightfall…

Brand, spanking new shiny version: we’ve updated this post with some creepy new reports from listeners brave enough to venture into these towns. Plus! A bonus scary spot for you to discover! Or, run screaming…whichever.

 

BONUS SCARINESS: SKINWALKER RANCH, UTAH

skinwalker ranch

Skinwalker Ranch takes its name from the Native American legends of demonic deities able to transform into the bodies of animals. There’s an uncomfortable tangle of occult lore and science fiction–mainly UFO sightings and exposure. Terrifying fireballs of lightning are said to slam down onto the ground and chase hapless wanderers. Other accounts of survivors of alien-based experiments were published in the Deseret News and the Las Vegas Mercury. The ranch borders the Ute Indian Reservation in west Uintah County. There’s even a low-budget horror movie called-obviously-“Skinwalker Ranch” to get you into the mood to explore or get you out of the mood if you’re sensible.

5 Utah Ghost Towns You Simply Must Explore

1. CISCO, UTAH:

cisco

(Photo credit: Kent Kanouse)

You’ve seen this creepy burg in multiple movies; Thelma and Louise, Vanishing Point, Don’t Come Knocking and the Johnny Cash song “Cisco Clifton’s Filling Station.” The snake-infested little town is chock full of crumbling buildings and “out of nowhere” gunshot sounds. Modern-day ghost hunters often report fainting, dizziness, and violent shuddering, usually coupled with strong winds that blow out of nowhere.

 

2. GRAFTON, UTAH:

grafton utah

(Photo credit: Carl Berger)

Another “movie star” town is Grafton, featured in Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid. Grafton was abandoned in the mid-1800s during the Black Hawk War when residents were terrified of Native American raids. If you listen closely, you can hear the sounds of war drums, and two dogs wander the tiny graveyard, suddenly changing into gigantic crows. Grafton has some of the highest reports of “Skinwalker” apparitions of any spot in the West.

 

3. THISTLE, UTAH:

thistle utah

(Photo credit: LemonJenny)

Thistle was a pleasant, bustling little town until the landslide in 1983 that damned the Spanish Fork River and flooded the town. Terrified residents fled with whatever they could carry. The town was buried under 100 feet of water and became Thistle Lake. The lake’s been drained since, but the creepy, subterranean remains of the town are bone-chilling. Searchers report seeing mysterious muddy footprints suddenly appearing on walls, and finding muddy water soaking their belongings stacked on dry ground.

 

4. OSIRIS, UTAH:

osiris utah

(Photo credit: Shawn Bagley)

The Holt Family descended on this little town in 1910 and constructed a huge creamery next to a river in Black Canyon. No one still knows why, but they insisted on naming the town Osiris after the Egyptian God of the Afterlife. The town’s population started dwindling when blackened forms were spotted rambling through the canyon, loping alongside wagons with glowing eyes. Other townsfolk reported wailing and mysterious altars set up in the creamery. Visit during the day, locals say these days the road in and out of town can suddenly become blocked by boulders and fallen trees after dark.

 

5. FRISCO, UTAH:

frisco

(Photo credit: Orientalizing)

The Silver Fever that infested miners in Utah’s San Francisco Mountains in 1875 blew Little Frisco into a wildly busy town, filled with brothels, bars and gambling halls. At its peak, sheriffs reported at least 10 deaths a day from drunken gun battles. Ten years later, a deadly cave-in at the town’s biggest mine nearly emptied the town. Miners struggling to remain were eventually scared off by The Widow in White, a wailing spectre looking for her lost love in the mine. Modern-day visitors foolish enough to enter at night report hearing screams and sobbing coming from the old bordello and the smell of gunpowder in the air.

Most importantly: you visit, you SEND US PICTURES!!!!  Good luck.

(Cover photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/brianholsclaw/)

Utah’s Five Most Haunted Spots

Utah’s Five Most Haunted Spots. You’re a busy person. You don’t have time to be wandering around a graveyard, tripping over gopher holes and looking for a ghost to terrify you. So, we rounded up the five most haunted spots along the Wasatch Front. Get in, scream like a little girl, get out. (Editor’s note: I picked some uber scary spots that aren’t always the first ones you hear about. They’ll just creep up on you.) It goes without saying: please do not trespass on private property, be polite, leave everything in better condition than they were before.

BTW: Ready for the ooky-spooky corn maze or a pumpkin patch? Find our complete guide to every single haunted house, corn maze and pumpkin patch along the Wasatch Front here. Seriously. My fingers are bloody stumps after typing that monster.

Utah’s Five Most Haunted Spots

The Rio Grande Railroad Depot: 

The old Rio Grande Railroad Depot may have been restored to its former glory, but security guards and visitors say the spirits weren’t scared off by the remodeling. The cafe and the ladies’ room on the main floor are prime spots to see the beautiful, dark-haired spirit said to have been run over by a train at the Depot. There’s also a shadowy apparition that’ll begin to approach you on the main floor- then vanish.

96% on the Creep-O-Meter.

 

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Old Bountiful Museum:

Frankly, the place just looks creepy enough by itself, but the old mink farm turned museum turned abandoned building still has piles of discarded artifacts that perhaps brought their spirits with them. Ghost hunters report terrifying encounters with dark spirits and strange, flashing lights on both floors.

84% on the Creep-O-Meter.

 

The Kirk Hotel in Tooele:

Guests and housekeeping report items floating through the air on their own and doors opening, then slamming shut. If you’re an orb freak, this is your place.

83% on the Creep-O-Meter.

 

Ben Lomond Suites in Ogden:

Rooms 1101 and 1102 are notorious for ghostly activity. Legend has it that a bride drowned in the tub on her wedding night, and when the groom came searching for her, committed suicide in his grief. Visitors report that the water turns on by itself in the tubs in those two rooms and broken-hearted sobbing. The elevators in the hotel are often said to work on their own.

85% on the Creep-O-Meter

 

Rock Canyon Trail in Provo: 

If you’re willing to rough it to get scared spitless, you’ll encounter anything from the apparition of a miner angrily swinging his pickaxe to the spirit of a man in 1980’s style clothing who falls off a cliff and disappears. The creepy part here? Sometimes, the entities follow you out of the canyon.

72% on the Creep-O-Meter

(Cover photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/binomialphoto/)